Theological truth is necessary. Often people who disagree with Scripture will try to “win over” others by their use of scripture out of context or presupposed from a traditional point of view. This podcast talks about those verses that are often used in isolation to “disprove” Sovereign Grace aka, the Gospel of Grace.

 

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Sometimes I wonder why I ever ended up in the pastorate. From the early days of childhood into high school I desired to be a surgeon, then along came chemistry and I was satisfied in music. Along the way, I’ve become an expert in many subjects and hobbies from illusions/sleight of hand to martial arts. I’ve spent countless hours studying the human mind, quantum physics, defensive logistics, combat theory, chess, and tonal dissonance. Years have taught my body to dance, climb mountains, swim, trackstand on a switchback, and devour ten thousand calories in 24 hours. My mind has learned to foster thought, engage the critics, leave the fight, stay the course, feel the pressure and rest in grace. Skills have prepared me to fix dryers, motherboards, vehicles, bones, restore homes, landscape, hang drywall, frame houses, dig footers, and put in the pipes. I can even sew, hem pants, taper a shirt, prepare a marketing analysis, produce video, graphic design, program websites, and set the clock on the microwave. The point, I’ve done a lot of stuff in my short life and none of it has ever been half-hearted. I don’t understand the purpose of being so-so at anything. Those things that my body did so well have fallen away to a thing called arthritis. What my brain used to manage abruptly wrecked through another harsh and painful experience known as depression. In all of it, I have never found an identity. None.

A common thread has always been stitched into every part of my life. The Word of God, from the earliest of days, has been a source of joy and power for me. It’s a grand example of the grace and mercy of the Lord to work in His children a love for Him through Scripture. For most of my life, I could engage in any forum, any hobby, any point in culture and do well. I’ve learned to shoot, sing, fight, play seven instruments and have done well at a few business ventures but in all of them, I have always found myself in the word, ministering to others, listening and teaching them the truth of Christ. As a matter of honesty, I never really wanted to be a pastor and was content with the idea of being used by the Lord in everything. But God in all His purpose will do with us as He chooses, not how we choose. In the Lord’s “putting” me into the ministry as a vocation I brought a lot of my personality and ‘skills’ to the table. I was taught early on that my ‘tool belt’ was vital to the success of the ministry of the church. Looking to be the best and giving myself the OK to be “all in”, I quickly began to surround myself with successful people who were accomplishing what I felt to be the right fruit.

Historically I have served in many areas of church life having worked with youth, children, music, teaching, seminaries, evangelism, missions, and everything in between. I have witnessed 300 enter the baptismal waters in a year’s time, seen thousands “come to faith” at “services”, and been on staff with church plants and mega-churches, some of the prior becoming the latter. In the end, even “ministry” never became my identity. There is a lot of heartache and pain under my belt for which I am eternally grateful because without it, I would have never truly seen the substance of Christ’s suffering and how we identify with Him. Having written several unpublished works on my journey, I’ve learned it doesn’t really matter at the end of all the suffering if we don’t finish well. I’ve also learned that pain is part of progress and thinking that utopic days are our goal is childish and foolish surrealism. There are a few pain points of ministry though that I’ve learned sting much harder than normal. In all the calamities of sorts, nothing has been more hurtful than when friends and loved ones reject the Lord Jesus and love the world more than ever.

  1. When Family Members Claim Christ but Hate Truth
  2. When the Fan Base Becomes the Mob
  3. When the Brother is replaced with Beligerance 

Suppose that a life without Christ was blissful with no pain. No poetry in the heart from the labor of pestilence and persecution. A life with no rejection, separation, angst, or problems appears on the surface to be ideal, but my experience as well as the experience of the record of history, including Scripture, is that pain becomes part of the joy. It is the darkness in our lives that makes the light so glorious. To leave suffering in life would be to leave the fellowship of Christ, and in turn, bring suffering all the more as it became an eternal certainty rather than a light and momentary teacher. When bridled with agony, I have learned to lean into Scripture and thus into Jesus. Nothing can take the burden like Christ and His gospel of peace. Rest well in the power of Christ through His Word. 

I was always taught that these things were God’s gift for me to use for His glory. Now of course if they are enjoyed they are for His glory, but they are not what is needed by the church. While I have fixed a few computers, renovated a few buildings, and played a few funerals on the saxophone, the purpose of my life is to be a voice that points to the One that matters. Jesus Christ. I had to come to the end of my worth and usefulness and recognize that I was not the powerhouse I was always praised for being. This kind of death is hard on the esteem, but the grace of God, it’s powerful and useful. This means that all those years of training, leadership development, persuasion, influence etc. was all for nothing. Looking back I am thankful for having come through it, but at the time I counted my life as a large failure and a waste of God’s time as far as the ministry was concerned. This type of death makes your ministry history moot. As it should be. After all, didn’t John the Baptist even proclaim that Christ must increase therefore he would decrease? God took his life because the bridegroom gets the bride. So often, the current “church” gets the bride, the groom, the glory and the whole nine yards. They share their programs and people. The music and their measurements as if they are running for Ms. America. After all, isn’t ministry about attracting people to look at us? No. That’s the devil’s job.

As I finalize the final pages of my recent publication, I have decided to make an addendum inclusive of three final chapters. These will refer to recent (3 years) ongoings and attacks against me and others related to our congregation and teaching ministry for no real reason at all. The matter, while the theology is vital, really hurts me because the manner in which so many respond, attack or accuse their “brothers in Christ” is unbiblical and downright wicked. I forwarded a recent article to several brothers this week and below I have pasted a very good response to the matter . More will follow.

A Response to Dr. Michael A Cox’s Article: Is Calvinism Spiritual Racism? by Dr. Edward Dalcour, Ph.D.

I just read an article on the SBC Today site entitled: Is Calvinism Spiritual Racism?—by Dr. Michael A Cox—Pastor, FBC Pryor, OK (http://sbctoday.com/is-calvinism-spiritual-racism). Dr. Cox, as with others in the SBC, is now participating in the newest wrinkle of the SBC against Calvinism. Like the many others who have attempted to promote a patently synergistic soteriology, Cox takes it to an unusual level of mischaracterization and irresponsible scholarship.

First, it is not my intention here to provide a point by point exegetically refutation the passages that Dr. Cox misapplies (esp. John 3:16; 1 Tim. 2:4; and 2 Pet. 3:9). This has been countless times by myself and by many others. My intention is to provide some clarity and accuracy pertaining to Calvinism in light of Dr. Cox’s inaccurate depiction and maltreatment of it. And hopefully cause folks that read his article to invest in a more scholarly examination of it from qualified sources.

In the beginning of his article, Dr. Cox’s likens Calvinism with Hinduism when he states at the outset: “I will contend that Hinduism, Racism, and Calvinism have many things in common.” This kind of argument is, of course, logically invalid, as is the argument “all Catholics, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and Arminianism has many things in common such as conditional election; salvation being left in the hands of the unregenerate; faith and some kind of work(s) being required for salvation (regeneration); God cannot overpower man’s untouchable ‘free-will’ in salvation; etc.”

However, there is a rudimentary defect that is quite apparent throughout the content of his article. Dr. Cox’s assertions are grounded on mistaken views of what Calvinism (that is, the “doctrines of grace”) actually teaches. For example, Dr. Cox uses terms such as “spiritual determinism,” “spiritual caste,” “spiritual bigotry,” “spiritual prejudice,” etc. in his portrayal of Calvinism demonstrating his vast misunderstanding of it. This causes me to wonder if Dr. Cox has read even the most basic works on Calvinism and/or read any of standard Calvinistic/Reformed confessions.

Next Dr. Cox asserts: “It would be interesting to know how many non-Caucasians actually embrace five-point Calvinism as a genuine Bible doctrine.” Really? So here Dr. Cox uses an ad populum argument (fallacy) to validate biblical truth. Did Cox do any research at all on this? Is he aware of the Dutch Reformed movement in Africa, which is one of the largest movements in Africa? The Dutch Reform are a part of the World Fellowship of Reformed Churches—, which is one of the largest “Christian” international communions in the world. Embarrassingly, Dr. Cox is not well educated on religious demography—thus, he should not make these obtuse implications about how many non-Caucasians embrace Calvinism.

Further, in his effort to show that Calvinism is spiritually racist, Dr. Cox asserts: “Calvinism is nothing short of baptized racism, advocating the dogma that one group, the non-elect, is condemned by God to spiritual inferiority and another group, the elect, is destined to spiritual superiority.” Again, statements such as these only show his lack of knowledge on Calvinism. I wonder if Dr. Cox would see Paul’s statement in Rom. 9:21 regarding the Potter (God) having the right (exousian) to make (poiew) from the same lump(all men) one person/vessel for honor (timēn) and another for no honor (atimian), “nothing short of baptized racism, advocating the dogma that one group, the non-elect, is condemned by God . . . and another group, the elect, is destined to spiritual superiority”?

Apparently, Dr. Cox just cannot accept a God that would do this. Nor can Dr. Cox accept Paul’s presentation of vessels/men of wrath that God prepared (note the perfect passive form of katartizw) for destruction. To be sure, the God that Paul speaks of is not the God that Dr. Cox imagines.

Dr. Cox represents Calvinism as “nothing short of promoting a prideful theology of supposed spiritual superiority, due to election.” However, in Acts 16:6ff., we read that the Holy Spirit stopped Paul and Timothy from preaching the gospel in Asia in which many people died without ever hearing the gospel. So would Dr. Cox also charge the Holy Spirit with having a “prideful theology” of election and “baptized racism” since it was the Holy Spirit who chose to prevent some from hearing the gospel? (as the Father does, cf. Luke 10:20-22).

But what I find most befuddling is that Dr. Cox holds a DMin. with (as his bio states) an emphasis on biblical hermeneutics. However, Dr. Cox fast-ball pitches the big three Arminian passages (viz., John 3:16; 1 Tim. 2:4; and 2 Pet. 3:9) into his article presupposing they support his views (with no hint of exegetical verification). It is evident to me that Dr. Cox does not apply the same hermeneutical (and exegetical) emphasis to these three passages that he does to passages he would use to affirm, say,  justification by faith alone or the deity of Christ. For Dr. Cox, it seems that “tradition” and his devotion to synergism dictates his so-called hermeneutical method.

Does Dr. Cox suppose that no one who reads his article, which is circulated outside the safety of his church bulletin, has (or will) meaningfully interacted with these three (and other) passages on a basic exegetical level arriving at an interpretation in opposition to his view? The fact that Dr. Cox casually tosses them into the mix in an attempt to prove his position shows that his interpretation of these three passages are really established by the removal of single passages out of its entire context and pre-assigning a universal meaning to pas (“all”) and kosmos (“world”). This, to be sure, is in no way an “emphasis on biblical hermeneutics.” Rather, it is an emphasis on tradition and high emotion—thus, not on the actual exegesis of the passages.

Next Dr. Cox says, “God has demonstrated his love for all people many times over. He did so by promising to make Abraham, a.k.a. Abram, from Ur of the Chaldeans (Gen. 11:31), a blessing to all the families of the earth (Gen. 12:1-3). It is amazing to me that Dr. Cox would make this kind of hermeneutic mistake—applying a universal meaning to the phrase in Gen. 12:3, “all the families of the earth,” when the Apostle Paul tells us what is meant here: “The Scripture, foreseeing that God would justify the Gentiles by faith, preached the gospel beforehand to Abraham, saying, ‘All the nations will be blessed in you’” (Gal. 3:8). Hence according to Paul, “all the nations” (note Paul usage of ethnē, “nations/Gentiles” and not phulai [LXX] to explicate his point) refers to God’s eternal purpose in justifying (note the present indic. dikaioi, “justifies”) the Gentiles by faith (that which was foreseen in Gen. 12). In Acts 13:48, the Gentiles rejoiced at the fact that salvation was brought also to them: “When the Gentiles heard this, they began rejoicing and glorifying the word of the Lord; and as many as had been appointed [note the plu-perf. part, tetagmenoi] to eternal life believed.”

Virtually every time ethnē/ethnos is used in the NT, it referred to unbelieving Gentiles/heathens, and at times, believing Gentles, and only rarely was it used to denote “people” in a general sense. Dr. Cox seems oblivious to the apostle’s own interpretation of Gen. 12:3 overlooking the exegetical points and Paul’s defining context of the entire chapter of Gal. 3. Even more, in Gal. 3:29, Paul defines as to what nations are blessed (and thus, the promise of Gen 12): “And if you belong to Christ, then you are Abraham’s descendants, heirs according to promise.” Thus, the ones who “belong to Christ” are the heirs according to the promise or blessing of Abraham. In the same sense, Rev. 5:9 states of the Son: “You were slain, and purchased for God with Your blood men from every tribe and tongue and people and nation [ethnos].” Does Dr. Cox realize that God loving all of His people/family and sending His Son to die for them is consistent with Calvinism?

As seen, Dr. Cox’s conclusions of Calvinism (as “spiritual racism,” etc.) are built on faulty presuppositions. I do not think Dr. Cox would charge Calvinism with “spiritual racism” likening it to Hinduism and assert many other mischaracterizations if Dr. Cox reached at least an elementary level of understanding as to what Calvinism actually affirms.

Lastly, as with so many Christians who are so antagonistic to Calvinism, Dr. Cox 1) holds to a crass and mistaken understanding of Calvinism, 2) does not engage in proper exegesis on the passages he uses to endorse conditional election and universal atonement,which is especially seen when he applies a universal meaning to various OT passages and Greek terms such as pas and kosmos when they are contextually unwarranted, and 3) seems to have a disjointed view of the love of God limiting it to a universal redemptive love for every single person, which results in a view where God keeps waiting for and wanting all men to respond to His “great” plan of redemption, but He keeps failing in His effort to save all men every time someone dies in unbelief.

As a Christian apologist (and esp. for pastors), truth and providing an accurate representation of both biblical doctrine and other religious systems (Christian or non-Christian) is first and foremost. Dr. Cox presents in his article his “personal” views of Calvinism in which, in my assessment, are very misleading and inaccurate showing his lack of scholarship and basic understanding of Calvinism. As seen, he has fallen prey to the traditional ruse and pride of the autosoteric (self-salvation) system of Arminianism in which prompted him to launch an unreasonable and very haphazard attack on Calvinism.

Because Dr. Cox’s knowledge of Calvinism is apparently vacuous, he sees it as, among other things, a “prideful theology.” However, if he would ever take the time to do a scholarly study and educate himself on what it actually teaches he would understand that Calvinism, that is, the doctrines of grace exalts and recognizes God as the sovereign God in and of all things (cf. Eph. 1:1) including the eternal destiny of all menhence, salvation is of God alone! In contrast, Arminian soteriology sees man as sovereign over his own eternal destiny—thus, it is man’s so-called righteous “ability” cooperating with God’s plan (just as Rome teaches), not God’s grace alone. Hence, the Arminian system is a man-centered system (which we call pride), it is a  “I did it” scheme in which the ultimate decision of choosing Christ is essentially placed in the hands of the unregenerate sinner (in the face of opposing biblical passages, such as John 6:44; 63; 8:43-44, 47; Rom. 8:7-8; 1 Cor. 1:30-31; etc.)

Calvinism is called the “doctrines of grace” for the simple reason that Scripture presents that by God’s grace alone, He gave to Christ those whom He chose for Himself to deliver and set them free from the bondage of sin. He chose these in love, before the foundation of the world, not on the basis of a foreknowledge response to their works, but according to the kind intention of His will. These He made alive granting them faith justifying them in which He adopted them as sons when He was not obligated to do so—but by His grace alone: “So then, He has mercy on whom He desires, and He hardens whom He desires.” And, “By His doing,” not our doing, we “are in Christ Jesus” (1 Cor. 1:3-31; cf. Rom. 8:28-30; 9:16, 21-23; Eph. 1:4-5; 2:8-10; Phil. 1:29; 2 Thess. 2:13; etc.).

– Dr. Edward Dalcour

Crisis of Faith CoverAs the Lord allows, I plan to release this book in January 2016.  It chronicles my journey of faith, theologically, from birth to date and reveals just how harshly Reformed doctrine has affected me, my life and my family as well as my ministry.  In the last ten years or so a movement has ensued that seems to be taking large groups of Evangelicals and dividing them from fellowship.  I have experienced this first hand and in all honesty, have experienced hatred, hurt, death threats and the like while keeping quiet and tending to my own business.

My hope in this writing would be to allow the reader to journey with me, see what I see and then realize that everyone, no matter who they are, at one time or another has had a crisis of faith.  During these times believers are to stand together, work with each other, pray for grace and reconciliation and see God work through it.  Sadly, it hasn’t been the case.  So, my crisis of faith resulted in major growth for my good, but it has been painful.  Pray for me as I put the final touches to this text and pray that the message of the gospel would be paramount to it all.

For His Glory,

James

To the pure, all things are pure, but to the defiled and unbelieving, nothing is pure; but both their minds and their consciences are defiled. They profess to know God, but they deny him by their works. They are detestable, disobedient, unfit for any good work.
(Titus 1:15-16 ESV)

From the beginning, we have prayed and followed God’s direction in all matters to best of our wisdom, and by His sovereign grace we have followed His leading and longed for service and obedience for the sake of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. He has been and always will be faithful and in Him we trust.   In 2004, as we were in Roanoke, VA, we began feeling the need and burden to see a church planted in Claxton as a central point for church plants across the area. Despite popular belief, only 12 to 15 percent of individuals in Evans County alone are affiliated with ANY church and these numbers of church goers decline as the population changes each year.

Not only studies but also the biblical narrative reveals to us that planting new and smaller churches, even multiple congregations in the same city is best practice in regards to evangelism and ministry. It takes only a few seconds to look at many church roles to discover the truth about the “back door” of churches in America. Planting churches is one, not the only strategy to answer this issue and it is to this that my family, and I have been called.

From 2004 until 2011 we had conversations with many young men, church planters, local and remote pastors about partnering with us in church planting but never considered that we would be the ones moving to Evans County to start a church. But in May of 2011, the Lord changed it all, He put in both my and Robyn’s heart to come and we made open plans to make a transition within two years. By making our calling and plans public, we found God moving quicker than expected and the first Sunday in September we moved to Georgia from the East Bay of California and our plan after arrival scheduled things to begin about within about two years. Through word of mouth alone we scheduled a date for an informational meeting to be set in October of 2011. At that first meeting, we had over forty people attend and the consensus was that we would begin meeting weekly in bible study for the purpose of seeking a church to be planted.

Families from Lyons, Statesboro, Glenville, Pooler, Savannah, Rincon, Springfield, Reidsville, Vidalia and other areas gathered over the next few months until March of 2012 when we moved out of our living room into a small rental building that we currently occupy. All of us were astonished and are still amazed at the work of God. We have seen new life in Christ, baptisms and on July of 2014, we constituted with our founding families as members and today we have actively 58 covenant members including member’s children.

Having served in ministry in four states over nearly two decades, the heartbeat of the “bible belt” always seemed like a safe and sound location for church planting and in May of 2011 I contacted the GA Baptist Convention and spoke with Butch Butcher, the director of church planting and discussed with him about our plans to come and begin GraceTruth Church. He was elated and told me to contact Mr. James Bland, the Association Missionary or “Director of Missions” for Evans County to work with them in our efforts. I did, and that same day Mr. Bland said, “we don’t need you coming down here and messing up our current churches… we have enough Baptist churches here.” I attempted to help Mr. Bland see that we were not coming to move sheep from church to church but to reach the lost, equip the scattered and love the sheep. This conversation set the tone for the remainder of this portion of our experience.

When we arrived in Claxton, one of our first ministry plans was to assist a local church in Reidsville with their Fall Revival where I gave seven sermons and three plenary sessions with questions and answers over the week-long period. Some of those evenings Mr. Bland attended and offered a compliment to my teaching. We also in short time petitioned (Read Request) to be considered as an affiliated church of the local association where the response would be to assemble a committee to talk with me and our church leadership and then present us to the assembly of churches to be considered a “petitioning” church under watch care for twelve months.

As this process continued, the annual meeting of the association was at hand where we were supposed to be present and presented. Just a few days before the meeting I received a call from Mr. Bland that the committee needed more time and that they would not be presenting us at this time. Upon pushing, he gave me over ten reasons, of which all were petty assumptions, as to why he felt we were not “of like faith and order” even though we fully subscribe to the Baptist Faith and Message. I requested a meeting with the committee that was honored in February of 2013. At this meeting of 2 hours and 22 minutes, (which is recorded and available upon request) many accusations were made about our doctrine and practice, but as the conversation moved on, we settled the minds of these men that we were indeed of like faith, but due to the polity differences, this group felt it would be confusing for us to be a part of the local association. At the final moments of our meeting, we asked for a letter to be written to GraceTruth Church as to why we had decided to remove our petition from the TEBA. Mr. Ross made the comment that Mr. Bland should maybe even come to discuss it with the church to help them understand our decision. Several of the credentials group actually indicated they felt we should be a part of the association. We adjourned the meeting with prayer and a spirit of acceptance and agreement that we would await the letter to GraceTruth and decide if Mr. Bland would come or not at a later date. This letter never came.

A few weeks later, James Bland joined as a provisional member, the fellowship of Elza Baptist Church in Reidsville where Luke Adams, an assisting Elder/Pastor with GraceTruth, was Sr. Pastor. Though several people were skeptical about Mr. Bland’s presence, he and Pastor Luke discussed the matter and the church received him for a period of six months in an attempt to “get to know the church”. Within a few weeks, Mr. Bland spoke up at a business meeting and accused Rev. Adams of being a false teacher and of not being Southern Baptist. (Notes of this meeting available upon request) After a quick rebuke and the adjourning of the meeting, Mr. Bland continued to pass out literature and cause division. Some time later, Mr. Bland was a guest preacher at Eastside Baptist Church in Claxton and on that day he preached against the “false teachers” that had come into the area and among his sermon’s errors were not only false witness claims against Luke and me, but also grave theological errors. This sermon was transcribed and several local pastors were alarmed. (Audio and Transcription available)

The next day, Mr. Bland had an unsigned letter sent to all the churches in the association stating that me, Luke and another elder, Dave Hanson (who moved his family from California to help plant the church) were indeed false teachers, divisive, non-Baptistic, not of like faith and order, and other things that were hellish to say the least. (TEBA Accusation Letter) GraceTruth church had removed her petition and already petitioned with another local association and the only letter that was to be sent was to her outlining our conversation in February. This letter caused a storm of confusion and two long-standing churches in the association: Rehoboth Missionary Baptist Church (see statement) and Hagan Baptist Church (see letter) submitted a formal complaint of sinful behavior and bearing false witness against brethren against the men on the committee. Their response was a short “we did not mean to state these men were hyper-Calvinist” sent only to the associational churches.

I personally sent  two letters  asking for repentance and an explanation and to date, I have had no personal response from any member of the committee nor have I been allowed to have a conversation regarding the circumstances except for this “receipt of our withdrawal“. While I am cordial around the men, their words and accusations and lack of repentance did damage. Because of the confusion, four of our families moved on and since that time, several preachers in the association have and are currently preaching actual series of sermons (so-called) against us, calling “those” that teach “such things” as unbelievers and wicked. The damage has caused harm to several marriages, not just among our congregation, but among some of the associational churches. Several people have left their church because the local pastors would not stand up for or against the claims. All-in-all, we have become ostracized and even long-standing friendships are strained as people are unsure as to how to relate to me and our members.

While many of the state leadership did dialog with us, none of them were at liberty to give biblical instruction on the matter and while some of them gave stern rebuke, no public statement has been made on this matter. While this may be odd, the GBC has a long history of public statements concerning misconduct and public or political actions that do not suit certain criterion, but when the scriptural mandate of unity and repentance is at stake, they remain silent.  I pray that I may one day make a retraction of this post by way of an update. May the Lord bring us all together.

At the date of this post, May 24, 2014, in the last week, there have been two separate occasions where individuals have informed me or another member of our church that pastors and church members are continuing to gossip and cause trouble in an attempt to have our church removed from the area.  Many other advocates have called for repentance and biblical discipline but nothing has come. Public leaders have joined the bandwagon, singing in the gossip wind in order to discredit the teaching of our pastors and one such letter was voted in executive committee to be “not received” and discarded while the people passionately hated the truth.

While things like these seem deplorable, and they are, they are not outside the sovereignty of God’s glorious hand and His timing and purpose in them all is good. Therefore, our desire is to be biblical and humble in our dealings and these men along with subsequent murderous slanderers are forgiven. In the future, the Lord will prove the substance of these claims but the damage will never be completely healed and these actions will have far reaching implication for years and decades to come. When the truth of God’s love or the touch of His ministry and the power of His word springs forth through the ministry of the family of GraceTruth Baptist Church, many will rejoice, then the enemy will come and remind them that we are “scary” or “different” and they will rejoice no more having had the joy snatched away. In the end, the men who allowed these things to happen will be seen for what they are; either brothers who are restored to fellowship with us and others or liars who are not in the faith. My pray is that of Paul’s who desired God to “grant them repentance that they may escape the snare of the devil.”

The Tattnall-Evans Baptist Association of Churches has allowed these actions by a large majority and gone against their own  constitution and bylaws  as well as the referencing to biblical mandates contained within. I pray that as time moves on all these churches (the Christians in them) can see and do what is right. A current list of member churches will be listed here.

Lord have mercy,

Pastor James

I’ve noticed recently at how much “defining” of evangelical, calvinists and other seemingly antithetical circles that do not hold up to truth or history. An interesting article by the Economist suggests that Calivinism is causing division and the article truly reveals how misinformation plagues the church.

Take a look at Thabiti Anyabwile’s article on the Economist article and give me your thoughts.